Thursday, June 22, 2017

Long Way Home - Review

Long Way Home (Thunder Road, # 3)

By: Katie McGarry

Published: January 31st 2017 by Harlequin Teen

448 pages

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary

Source: Personal Kindle Library

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Seventeen-year-old Violet has always been expected to sit back and let the boys do all the saving.

It’s the code her father, a member of the Reign of Terror motorcycle club, raised her to live by. Yet when her dad is killed carrying out Terror business, Violet knows it’s up to her to do the saving. To protect herself, and her vulnerable younger brother, she needs to cut all ties with the club—including Chevy, the boy she’s known and loved her whole life.

But when a rival club comes after Violet, exposing old secrets and making new threats, she’s forced to question what she thought she knew about her father, the Reign of Terror, and what she thinks she wants. Which means re-evaluating everything: love, family, friends . . . and forgiveness.

Caught in the crosshairs between loyalty and freedom, Violet must decide whether old friends can be trusted—and if she’s strong enough to be the one person to save them all.

I read the first chapter of Long Way Home at the end of my copy of Walk the Edge. Obviously, Chevy and Violet have been secondary characters in the prior two books in this series, and their backstory has been set up all throughout the series. And then the publisher released a sampler (the first 60ish pages) on NetGalley. I didn't realize that it was a sampler until I downloaded it to my kindle. It was such a disappointment that it wasn't the full book, but since that 60ish pages ended at such a crucial part I decided to go ahead and preorder my copy. And I'm glad that I did. Katie McGarry is one of those authors that I can count on to be really consistent with her writing and characters.

I wasn't sure I was going to love Chevy and Violet. More Violet really. She was really angry with the club, with Chevy, in general after her father died. And she was kind of mean to Chevy when it was obvious that he only cared about her. Plus Violet's angry with the club for not treating her like one of the guys at times. I mean it's not like she wants to join the club, but she does want to be clued in to whatever information may pertain to her. And while I can respect that, I just got sick of her whining about not being treated how she wanted to be treated because she was a girl. If you've read the prior two books, you know that even Oz and Razor weren't getting all the answers they wanted and they were both guys. So I could understand Violet's point of view while also being a little annoyed with her issues at the same time.

Chevy was easy to like. He wants nothing more than to love Violet, but he knows how she feels about the club. Yet they are his family. I mean beyond friends that feel like family. They actually are his blood family. Yet even his mom isn't excited about him joining the MC. Chevy is being pulled in all different directions in this book, and I appreciated all that he was up against. I especially love the tie in with Isaiah from Katie's Pushing the Limits series. I want more more more information about this.

Katie McGarry does a good job or making the reader question the motives and intentions of the club with each book. You'd think that having been through two prior books where we find out that the Terror has nothing but good intentions for the characters they consider family that the MC would be beyond questioning, but with each book there's plenty to create doubt.

I also get so attached to Katie's side characters. Pigpen and Addison are both ones that I want more from. I hope she explores both of their stories in the future.

Favorite quotes:

-"I've got you, Violet. I swear to God I've got you."

-"The words out of your mouth aren't the only things she hears."

-"I'm secure in who I am and other people's definitions don't define me."

I do have to say that even though I enjoyed Long Way Home and read it quickly, this is not my favorite of Katie McGarry's books or even my favorite of the series. I want more of the side characters, and that's one of the best signs that I look for in a good series. Even without this being my favorite Katie McGarry book, Long Way Home gets 4 Stars. Have you read Long Way Home? What did you think? Let me know!

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Can't Wait for Kissing Max Holden

Can't-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Wishful Endings to spotlight and talk about the books we're excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they're books that have yet to be released as well. It's based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine. Find out more here.

Kissing Max Holden

By: Katy Upperman

Expected Publication: August 1st 2017 by Swoon Reads

304 pages

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Kissing Max Holden was a terrible idea...

After his father has a life-altering stroke, Max Holden isn't himself. As his long-time friend, Jillian Eldridge only wants to help him, but she doesn't know how. When Max climbs through her window one night, Jill knows that she shouldn't let him kiss her. But she can't resist, and when they're caught in the act by her dad, Jill swears it'll never happen again. Because kissing Max Holden is a terrible idea.

With a new baby sibling on the way, her parents fighting all the time, and her dream of culinary school up in the air, Jill starts spending more and more time with Max. And even though her father disapproves and Max still has a girlfriend, not kissing Max is easier said than done. Will Jill follow her heart and allow their friendship to blossom into something more, or will she listen to her head and stop kissing Max Holden once and for all?

What are you guys waiting on this week? Let me know!

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Top Ten Series I've Been Meaning to Start

Top 10 Tuesday is a post hosted by The Broke and the Bookish and this week's topic is Top Ten Series I've Been Meaning to Start.

  1. Nyxia (The Nyxia Triad, # 1) by Scott Reintgen - I have this one for review but just haven't gotten around to it yet.
  2. Before She Ignites (Fallen Isles Trilogy, # 1) by Jodi Meadows - This is another one that I have to review.
  3. Rebel of the Sands (Rebel of the Sands, # 1) by Alwyn Hamilton - The original cover release had me ignoring this one, but the redesigned covers had me checking out the description which sounds awesome.
  4. Riders (Riders, # 1) by Veronica Rossi - I really enjoyed her Under the Never Sky series, but I just never got my hands on Riders.
  5. Falling Kingdoms (Falling Kingdoms, # 1) by Morgan Rhodes - I remember when this book released. I was interested, but I wasn't ready to take a chance on it because the author was unknown to me. As each book releases in the series I regret not checking out book 1 when I had the chance.
  6. Half Bad (Half Bad Trilogy, # 1) by Sally Green - I actually own this one, but it just hasn't been a priority for me right now.
  7. Paper Princess (The Royals, # 1) by Erin Watt - Holly recommended this series to me a while back, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.
  8. The Passage (The Passage, # 1) by Justin Cronin - I've seen great ratings for this series, but the length of each book has me putting them off.
  9. Strange the Dreamer (Strange the Dreamer, # 1) by Laini Taylor - I really enjoyed her Daughter of Smoke and Bone series, but this is one that I haven't gotten my hands on yet so I keep putting it off.
  10. Carve the Mark (Carve the Mark, # 1) by Veronica Roth - This is another one that I just haven't had an opportunity to read because I don't own it. It just hasn't been a priority.

You guys this is just the TIP of the iceberg on the series that I want to start but haven't for various reasons. Have you read any of these? Any that I need to move up on my priority list? Which series have you been meaning to start? Let me know!

Monday, June 19, 2017

Cover Reveal - The Sound of Light by Claire Wallis

The Sound of Light

By: Claire Wallis

Expected Publication: July 17, 2017

320 pages

Genre: Contemporary, Romance, Suspense

( Goodreads | Amazon | Kobo )

*Note: The above link to Amazon is an affiliate link. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--My littlest girl has always been a bit peculiar. It was nothing I could ever put a finger on, but I always knew there was something inside her that made her a different kind of special. A deeper kind.

K'acy's got a light around her, one that'll just about knock you over, especially if you don't see her coming. She's got music in her soul, too. Deep, resonating music that echoes and hums, just like the notes that come from the bass guitar she's had attached to her hip since the day she turned thirteen years old.

She's got a hell of a secret, yes, but she does what she's got to do to make it one worth having. She takes care of people. She changes their stories. I spent my life telling both of my girls that you always gotta do what's right, even when it hurts, and it makes me proud to know she was listening.

I saw the way she looked at that boy on the day they met, and I knew right then that things were going to change. Two different people from two different worlds is nothing but a recipe for heartbreak, and when the lies pile higher and higher, it can change a person into something they're not.

It took me dying all those years ago to finally figure out just exactly how special my K'acy really is, and even though I'm not with her anymore, I don't want that boy and his family to change her. I want her to keep doing what's right, even when it hurts.

Because that's who she is inside. That's her deeper kind of special.

**This stand-alone novel from Claire Wallis is intended for readers age 17 and up.**

** Release Date: July 17th, 2017 ** THE SOUND OF LIGHT will be released in print format via Amazon and in digital format from Amazon, Nook, iBooks, and Kobo. The e-book should be available for pre-order on Amazon, Kobo, and iTunes today!!!

You can sign up for Claire Wallis's newsletter where you can receive bonus book teasers, stories, and information about her books. Also, check out her website: www.clairewallis.com.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Sunday Post - 252 & Stacking the Shelves - 190

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ The Caffeinated Book Reviewer ~this meme was inspired in part by ~ In My Mailbox~ It's a chance to share News. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Not much going on this week. It was one of the most normal weeks we've had recently. I did have another doctor's appointment and ultrasound for Baby Boy on Friday. I also had to get the oil changed in the car. Today we're celebrating Father's Day and birthdays for myself and my brother. This week Husband and I will be gone on a business trip with his job Wednesday through Saturday. I have a couple of posts scheduled during the time we'll be gone, but I won't be back online until Saturday evening. Little Girl will be staying with her grandparents while we're gone. This will be longest we've been away from her. I know she'll have fun, and we really could use some time alone together, but I'll miss her so much. Hope you all have a Happy Father's Day.

Also, PLEASE check out my Calling All Recommendations post linked below. Feel free to give me your recommendations on this post, but I do have a couple of guidelines for what I'm looking for listed in the post if it's not too much trouble for you to check out, I'd really appreciate it!

THIS PAST WEEK:

Monday: Review of Shadowcaster (Shattered Realms, # 2) by Cinda Williams Chima (4 Stars)
Tuesday: Top Ten Book Dads
Wednesday: Can't Wait for The Becoming of Noah Shaw (The Shaw Confessions, # 1) by Michelle Hodkin
Thursday: Calling All Recommendations: Contemporary

UPCOMING THIS WEEK:

Monday: Cover Reveal for The Sound of Light by Claire Wallis
Tuesday: Top Ten Series I've Been Meaning to Start
Wednesday: Can't Wait for Wednesday
Thursday: Review of Long Way Home (Thunder Road, # 3) by Katie McGarry

Don’t forget to sign up for the 2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge! You have until December 15, 2017 to sign up. Each month there will be a giveaway for those participating with an end of the year giveaway too! Click on the picture below or the link above to find out more!

Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga's Reviews.

A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, # 3)

By: Sarah J Maas

Published: May 2nd 2017 by Bloomsbury Childrens Books

699 pages

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal, Fae, Faeries

Source: Borrowed from Holly

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--A nightmare, I’d told Tamlin. I was the nightmare.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit—and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well. As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords—and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

That's it for my shelves and recaps of my past and upcoming week. What did you add to your shelves this week? Any bookish news you want to talk about? Let me know!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Calling All Recommendations: Contemporary

Hey guys, I'm in need of some help. I've found myself surrounded by fantasy books in my possession lately. While I love that genre, fantasy has recently bogged me down, and I find that I do best by varying up my genres periodically so that I don't get burned out of any one particular genre. That being said, I'm looking for some contemporary reads that are AWESOME.

A few guidelines if you don't mind:

  1. Characters between the ages of 17 and 30ish.
  2. Please no overly descriptive sexual scenes. The occasional scene doesn't bother me, but when it happens frequently or is described in a bit too much detail, I'm not a huge fan.
  3. Please no LGBTQAI.
  4. Can we try to avoid cheating? Love triangles are fine as long as there's no cheating.
  5. No anti-God characters or themes please. I'm not necessarily looking for Christian reads (although, I'll take some of those suggestions as well), but just not characters that are completely opposed to God.
  6. Also, please no political agendas.
  7. Think authors like Colleen Hoover, Kasie West, Simone Elkeles, Amy Harmon, and Katie McGarry. (But you'd be wasting your time recommending anything by these guys because I've read them all.)

Hit me with your suggestions and favorite contemporary reads please!!! Thanks so much!

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Can't Wait for The Becoming of Noah Shaw

Can't-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Wishful Endings to spotlight and talk about the books we're excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they're books that have yet to be released as well. It's based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine. Find out more here.

The Becoming of Noah Shaw (The Shaw Confessions, # 1)

By: Michelle Hodkin

Expected Publication: November 7th 2017 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

384 pages

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--In the first book of the Shaw Confessions, the companion series to the New York Times bestselling Mara Dyer novels, old skeletons are laid bare and new promises prove deadly. This is what happens after happily ever after.

Everyone thinks seventeen-year-old Noah Shaw has the world on a string.

They’re wrong.

Mara Dyer is the only one he trusts with his secrets and his future.

He shouldn’t.

And both are scared that uncovering the truth about themselves will force them apart.

They’re right.

I enjoyed the Mara Dyer series, even though the last book was my least favorite and was a bit of a let down for an ending to me. And I'm a little worried about this description where it seems to indicate that Noah and Mara will end up apart. However, I need to at least check this out. What are you guys waiting on this week? Let me know!

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Top Ten Book Dads

Top 10 Tuesday is a post hosted by The Broke and the Bookish and this week's topic is Top Ten Fathers in Books.

You guys, if I thought this subject was difficult and sad with Mother's it is even worse with fathers. They seem to be either dead, not present, completely disconnected, or an outright villain in the majority of books that I've read. And that's not just sad, it is really unacceptable. I realize that our family units have taken a big hit over the years, and it isn't unusual for a father to not be present, but this is just awful. We need some good parents in our YA books!

  1. Bailey's Dad & Fern's Dad from Making Faces by Amy Harmon - Bailey's dad is a wrestling coach for the school and has been Bailey's biggest supporter. Fern's dad is a preacher and is there for her as well as many others in the community.
  2. Samuel from The Captive Heart by Michelle Griep - Samuel has a two year old daughter. His wife was killed in a fire. And it is clear that Samuel adores his daughter.
  3. Kiara's Dad from Rules of Attraction by Simone Elkeles - Kiara's dad takes in a troubled teen that needs his help. He even has Carlos's back in a very dangerous situation.
  4. Brimstone from Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor - Although Brimstone isn't Karou's physical father, he's been a father to her in all the ways that count.
  5. Mr. Garrett from My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick - This man is all about doing everything he can for his family.
  6. Lara Jean's Dad from To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han - Lara Jean's dad has been doing the single parent thing for his three girls. He's a doctor (if I remember correctly). And he's really been there for his girls.
  7. Charlie's Dad from On the Fence by Kasie West - Another single dad with a lot of kids.
  8. Abe from Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead - Okay so Abe isn't what I'd typically look for in a "good dad" but he stepped it up for Rose there toward the end, and was always really there when she needed him. Plus he was hilarious.
  9. Charlie from Twilight by Stephenie Meyer - Okay guys, this is debatable. Charlie was quite a bit oblivious when it comes to what was going on with Bella, but at least he was present, and he did care. That gives him significant advantage over 90% of the other dad's in the books I've read.

And that's seriously all I've got! If you guys know of some other great fathers in books, please let me know!

Monday, June 12, 2017

Shadowcaster - Review

Shadowcaster (Shattered Realms, # 2)

By: Cinda Chima Williams

Published: April 4th 2017 by HarperTeen

551 pages

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

Source: Publisher via Edelweiss (Thank you!!)

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Alyssa ana'Raisa is the reluctant princess heir to the Gray Wolf throne of Fells, a queendom embroiled in a seemingly endless war. Hardened by too many losses, Lyss is more comfortable striking with a sword than maneuvering at court. After a brush with death, she goes on the offensive, meaning to end the war that has raged her whole life. If her gamble doesn't pay off, she could lose her queendom before she even ascends to the throne.

Across enemy lines in Arden, young rising star Captain Halston Matelon has been fighting for his king since he was a lýtling. Lately, though, he finds himself sent on ever more dangerous assignments. Between the terrifying rumors of witches and wolfish warriors to the north and his cruel king at home, Hal is caught in an impossible game of life and death.

Set in the world of the acclaimed Seven Realms series, this is a thrilling story of the unfathomable costs of war, the allure of dark magic, and two principled and conflicted characters, drawn together despite everything they stand to lose.

I enjoyed Flamecaster, but it wasn't without a few issues for me. So I was excited when I saw Shadowcaster for review. I put off reading it until closer to the publication date, yet as the date approached, I fell into a reading slump. The slump had me uninterested in most things fantasy related. I wasn't opposed to fantasy itself, but just that sometimes the genre focuses so little on character relationships due to world building and such. It's funny because I actually forced myself to read two very slow, and very un-character driven fantasy books before picking up Shadowcaster. I definitely wasn't in the mood for more fantasy after those books, yet I knew that I really needed to get this book read and reviewed since I was already past the publication date. Thankfully, Shadowcaster was a much more interesting and character read than the previous two books I read.

One thing I wasn't expecting (but should have been due to the book description) was that Ash wouldn't be a narrator at all in Shadowcaster. As a matter of fact, Shadowcaster goes back in time from where Flamecaster ended so there is an overlapping of time between these two books. As the description states, Shadowcaster primarily follows Lyss and Hal. Lyss is Ash's younger sister and now in line for the throne as Princess Heir. She's only 15 years old which feels very young to me, but I appreciate how Cinda Williams Chima treated her age is relative. What Lyss has experienced in her 15 years is very different from what teenagers face in our culture. Hal is a Captain in the army for the enemy, Arden. But his father has recently been on the outs with King Gerard, and Hal is taking the punishment for that in that King Gerard seems to be trying to have him killed by placing him in impossible situations. Hal is eventually captured as a prisoner of war and over an extended period of time is exposed to Lyss not knowing that she is Princess Heir of the Fells.

Lyss and Hal aren't the only narrators. Jenna from Flamecaster does play a role and she does narrate a few chapters. She's the biggest tie in that we have to the previous book. There's also a narrator named Breon who seems to be from the same place as Jenna originally. These two have a path that appears to be tied to each other although they've yet to meet. And there may even have been another narrator or two, but I can't remember. These four are the key players though. If you read my review of Flamecaster, you'll remember that I said this type of narration style isn't really my favorite. Typically, I don't mind dual narratives as long as the characters a following the same general part of the story, but when we begin to add on more and more narrators whose pieces of the puzzle are seemingly unrelated I tend to struggle, or at the very least I find it much easier to put the book down when a narration swap occurs. Having finished two books in this series, I see why Cinda Williams Chima chooses to narrate in this manner, but that doesn't mean I always enjoy it as much as I could. Especially early on in the book when the pieces of the puzzle feel so far away from each other.

I will say that this might be a coincidence, but I saw a lot of naming similarities between Shadowcaster and the A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R R Martin. I don't know if this was perhaps done on purpose as a nod to ASoIaF, or if this was an accident where the author's subconscious took over, or maybe it is just a coincidence. There was a Littlefield (Littlefinger), Breon (Brienne), Alyssa (Lysa), I can't remember the character's name in SC but it reminded me of Tommen, and I remember telling my husband of a place mentioned in SC that had a similar name too, but I didn't write them down at the time so I don't remember. This isn't a huge thing. Just something I noted.

Favorite quotes:

-We are a land of orphans, Lyss thought, doing the work of dead parents.

-"I always think that if I tell the truth, people can't help but agree. When they don't, I lose my temper and everything goes south from there."

-"...we need to let go of what we have been doing and take a chance. If we do what we've always done, we'll get what we've always gotten..."

-A civil war has no winners, only losers, and is to be avoided at all costs.

Shadowcaster was better than I was expecting due to the mood I've been in and the previous two books that I'd read immediately prior in the same genre. Lyss and Hal's storyline was the most interesting to me and kept me coming back for more. I truly hope that we get more of them in the next book, but I'm afraid that might not be the case if book 3 follows an entirely new set of main characters. I had a few small issues like the narration style making it easier for me to put this book down and the similarities to A Song of Ice and Fire names and locations. In the end, Shadowcaster gets 4 Stars. Have you read Shadowcaster? What did you think? Let me know!

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Sunday Post - 251 & Stacking the Shelves - 189

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ The Caffeinated Book Reviewer ~this meme was inspired in part by ~ In My Mailbox~ It's a chance to share News. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Monday my sister-in-law and one niece and two nephews came over to swim. It wasn't necessarily the best day for swimming as it did rain off and on while we were in the pool. Thankfully there was no thunder or lightening so we kept at it. The rest of the week was pretty lazy. After my crazy cleaning frenzy for our party last Saturday I took it easy this week.

THIS PAST WEEK:

Monday: Review of The Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings, # 1) by Jennifer Delamere (4 Stars)
Wednesday: Can't Wait for Whichwood by Tahereh Mafi

UPCOMING THIS WEEK:

Monday: Review of Shadowcaster (Shattered Realms, # 2) by Cinda Williams Chima
Tuesday: Top Ten Tuesday
Wednesday: Can't Wait for Wednesday

Don’t forget to sign up for the 2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge! You have until December 15, 2017 to sign up. Each month there will be a giveaway for those participating with an end of the year giveaway too! Click on the picture below or the link above to find out more!

Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga's Reviews.

After the Game (The Field Party, # 3)

By: Abbi Glines

Expected Publication: August 22nd 2017 by Simon Pulse

320 pages

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Sports

Source: Publisher via Edelweiss (Thank you!!)

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--The third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling Field Party series—a southern soap opera with football, cute boys, and pick-up trucks—from USA TODAY bestselling author Abbi Glines.

Two years ago, Riley Young fled from Lawton, Alabama. After accusing the oldest Lawton son, Rhett, of rape, everyone called her a liar and she had no option but to leave. Now she’s back, but she’s not at Lawton High finishing up her senior year. She’s at home raising the little girl that no one believed was Rhett’s.

Rhett is off at college living the life he was afraid he’d lose with Riley’s accusation, so Riley agrees to move back to Lawton so she and her parents could take care of her grandmother, who is suffering from Alzheimer’s. But the town still hasn’t forgotten their hate for her, and she hasn’t forgotten the way they turned on her when she needed them most.

When town golden boy Brady Higgens finds Riley and her daughter, Bryony, stranded on the side of the road in a storm, he pulls over and gives them a ride. Not because he cares about Riley, of course, but because of the kid.

But after the simple car ride, he begins to question everything he thought he knew. Could Brady believe Riley and risk losing everything?

Anatomy of an Affair: How Affairs, Attractions, and Addictions Develop, and How to Guard Your Marriage Against Them

By: Dave Carder

Expected Publication: September 5th 2017 by Moody Publishers

224 pages

Genre: Non-fiction, Christian

Source: Publisher via NetGalley (Thank you!!)

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--When it comes to adultery, never say, “It won’t happen to me.”

Just when you think your marriage is safe from adultery is when you may be the most vulnerable.

With eye-opening stories, clinical insights, and up-to-date data, Dave Carder reveals what adulterers learned the hard way—and what they want the rest of us to know to save us the pain.

Dave Carder, counselor and author of the bestselling Torn Asunder (100,000 in print), is a sought-after expert on issues of adultery. Here he helps you make your marriage adultery-proof by showing you:

How attractions can lead to affairs Ways you may be vulnerable to affairs The common ingredients of adultery How to restore intimacy to your marriage How to make wise, protective decisions Marriage is too sacred to be taken casually. Affairs are a very real threat, and they can destroy lives and families. For this reason, Anatomy of an Affair should be on every church leader’s and marriage counselor’s required reading list, and in the home of every married couple.

Includes charts and assessments to understand and guard against affairs.

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, # 2)

By: Sarah J Maas

Published: May 3rd 2016 by Bloomsbury USA Childrens

626 pages

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy, Fae, Faeries

Source:

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Feyre survived Amarantha's clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can't forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin's people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

With more than a million copies sold of her beloved Throne of Glass series, Sarah J. Maas's masterful storytelling brings this second book in her seductive and action-packed series to new heights.

That's it for my shelves and recaps of my past and upcoming week. What did you add to your shelves this week? Any bookish news you want to talk about? Let me know!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Can't Wait for Whichwood

Can't-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Wishful Endings to spotlight and talk about the books we're excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they're books that have yet to be released as well. It's based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine. Find out more here.

Whichwood

By: Tahereh Mafi

Expected Publication: November 14th 2017 by Dutton Books for Young Readers

368 pages

Genre: Middle Grade/Young Adult, Fantasy

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--A new adventure about a girl who is fated to wash the bodies of the dead in this companion to Furthermore.

Our story begins on a frosty night…

Laylee can barely remember the happier times before her beloved mother died. Before her father, driven by grief, lost his wits (and his way). Before she was left as the sole remaining mordeshoor in the village of Whichwood, destined to spend her days washing the bodies of the dead and preparing their souls for the afterlife. It’s become easy to forget and easier still to ignore the way her hands are stiffening and turning silver, just like her hair, and her own ever-increasing loneliness and fear.

But soon, a pair of familiar strangers appears, and Laylee’s world is turned upside down as she rediscovers color, magic, and the healing power of friendship.

I haven't actually read Furthermore yet, but since this is a companion, I don't mind sharing it. What are you guys waiting on this week? Let me know!

Monday, June 5, 2017

The Captain's Daughter - Review

The Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings, # 1)

By: Jennifer Delamere

Expected Publication: June 6th 2017 by Bethany House Publishers

352 pages

Genre: Christian Fiction, Historical Fiction

Source: Publisher via NetGalley (Thank you!!)

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Warm-Hearted Victorian Romance Brings 1880s London to Life

When a series of circumstances beyond her control leave Rosalyn Bernay alone and penniless in London, she chances upon a job backstage at a theater that is presenting the most popular show in London. A talented musician and singer, she feels immediately at home and soon becomes enthralled with the idea of pursuing a career on the stage.

A hand injury during a skirmish in India has forced Nate Moran out of the army until he recovers. Filling his time at a stable of horses for hire in London, he has also spent the past two months working nights as a stagehand, filling in for his injured brother. Although he's glad he can help his family through a tough time, he is counting the days until he can rejoin his regiment. London holds bitter memories for him that he is anxious to escape. But then he meets the beautiful woman who has found a new lease on life in the very place Nate can't wait to leave behind.

I've really been feeling a desire to read more Christian fiction lately, and I haven't been disappointed in the ones that I've chosen to read. The Captain's Daughter was no exception. This book has so many aspects that I love: Victorian England, morals and a message, plus a love story. Yet The Captain's Daughter was a good bit different than I expected it to be. Yes it takes place in Victorian England, but the majority of the plot takes place in the theater which isn't a setting that I often read about from this time period. At first I wasn't sold, but as the story went on, I became more and more interested in how the theater played into the plot. Yes this story has morals and a message, but this book shows the darker side of London's city life as well as some shady characters that aren't shy about branching out from the cultural norms to satisfy their personal desires. Yes this story has a love story, and well...I guess there's not really a but for that piece, and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Rosalyn was easy to like. She grew up with her sisters in an orphanage, but again where you'd think "oh no, not an orphanage, that must have been a horrible experience." Surely the loss of her parents was the horrible experience. The orphanage, however, was a blessing. Rosalyn went into a service position at the age of seventeen unlike most novels from this time period I've read that feature ladies that come from "a good name." Her journey to London ending up as a dresser for a theater company was filled with one misfortune after another. As I mentioned earlier, The Captain's Daughter doesn't shy away from the dark places and people, and Rosalyn seems to run into just about every kind of person who would take advantage of her. And Rosalyn is quite naive, however, she manages to navigate these situations even if there were times I thought she could have opened her eyes a little more.

Nate is honorable in just about every way. He's exactly what you would hope to find in a good man. He was in the army for seven years, and due to a hand injury is now only in the reserves. Yet he intends to return to service in hopes to atone for a mistake he made. He hasn't shared the whole story with any of his family so no one really understand his desire to return. In the meantime, Nate is working two jobs. He works at the stables during the day, but then he's temporarily working his brother's job as a stagehand for the theater so that Patrick doesn't lose his position while he heals from a broken leg. And it isn't just Nate. His whole family is noble. They seek to help others as often as they can. They have a few boarders living in their home. Nate does work for the parsonage and his mother and sisters work with a ladies' home.

I appreciated that the Christian aspects felt genuine and not forced at all. The Captain's Daughter might have had some shady characters, but there were plenty of heartfelt characters just trying to do the right thing. I loved the mix. And I always appreciate a story that uses Christ as a moral compass without feeling like it is preaching to the reader.

Favorite quotes:

-"Don't be so quick to give up what God has clearly provided."

-"Grab onto the opportunities that open to you."

-How ironic that he could wish for her to be happy and yet be so pained to see it.

-"But that still doesn't absolve me for what happened." "Perhaps not. But then, absolution doesn't come through what we can do, does it? It comes from another source. One greater than ourselves."

The Captain's Daughter was a great choice for me considering I've been in a bit of a reading slump. It pulled me in quickly, but beyond that, I didn't want to put The Captain's Daughter down. I liked how this book had everything I expected but done in a way that caught me off guard. The Captain's Daughter gets 4 Stars from me. Have you read The Captain's Daughter? What did you think? Let me know!

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Sunday Post - 250 & Stacking the Shelves - 188

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ The Caffeinated Book Reviewer ~this meme was inspired in part by ~ In My Mailbox~ It's a chance to share News. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Well guys...IT'S A BOY!!! His name will be Asher Mattox which means "Blessed Gift of God". We announced to our families on Saturday in a Gender Reveal/Naming Party. I can't believe it's June already! This year is flying by. Because of the party yesterday I spent the majority of this week cleaning house. But I actually enjoy having a party as an excuse to deep clean my house. Friday we also had a doctor's appointment where we had the anatomy scan for Asher. I love those ultrasounds because they spend so much more time letting you see the baby and showing you what's what. Unfortunately, he was pretty much curled into a ball so even though they got to see what they needed, we didn't get any good pictures. This was a busy blogging week, and despite being super busy, I also managed a decent amount of time to read.

THIS PAST WEEK:

Monday: Review of The Law of Moses (The Law of Moses, # 1) by Amy Harmon (5 Stars)
Tuesday: Top Ten Most Anticipated Releases of Q3/Q4 2017
Wednesday: Can't Wait for Renegades by Marissa Meyer
Thursday: May 2017 EOM Wrap Up
Friday: Discussions Only We Know: Diversity
Saturday: Problems Only We Know # 6 - Memory

UPCOMING THIS WEEK:

Monday: Review of The Captain's Daughter by Jennifer Delamere
Tuesday: Ten Recent Adds to My TBR in X Genre
Wednesday: Can't Wait for Wednesday

Don’t forget to sign up for the 2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge! You have until December 15, 2017 to sign up. Each month there will be a giveaway for those participating with an end of the year giveaway too! Click on the picture below or the link above to find out more!

Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga's Reviews.

A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses, # 1)

By: Sarah J Maas

Published: May 5th 2015 by Bloomsbury USA Childrens

421 pages

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal, Fae

Source: Borrowed from Holly

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--Feyre's survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price ...

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre's presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Of Beast & Beauty

By: Stacey Jay

Published: July 14th 2015 by Tantor Audio

391 pages (10 CDs)

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Retellings

Source: Free Audio Download from Sync

( Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository )

*Note: The above links to Amazon and Book Depository are affiliate links. Affiliate links support giveaways for Somewhere Only We Know readers.

Goodreads description--It's pointless. Hopeless. Even if she weren't afraid of me, we'll always be enemies at the core . . . In the city of Yuan, the blind Princess Isra is raised to be a human sacrifice. Her death will ensure her city's vitality. In the desert, a mutant beast named Gem fights to save his people, known as the Monstrous, from starvation. Neither dreams that, together, they can return balance to their worlds. When Gem is captured for trying to steal Yuan's enchanted roses, he becomes a prisoner of the city. Isra enlists his help, and soon begins to care for him-and to question everything she has been brought up to believe. She's a queen; I'm her prisoner. I am her monster and she is mine.

That's it for my shelves and recaps of my past and upcoming week. What did you add to your shelves this week? Any bookish news you want to talk about? Let me know!

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Problems Only We Know # 6 - Memory

I'm starting a new feature called Problems Only We Know. This is feature is meant to be funny--sarcastic at times-- that highlights on a few topics here and there that can be annoying or small inconveniences that only readers/bloggers will understand.

Let's talk memory.

Have you guys ever thought about the sheer amount of knowledge we book bloggers have to remember? Release dates. Which books are for review and which are for pleasure? Where did you get the book? NetGalley? Edelweiss? The author/publisher directly? Or wait...do you actually own this one?

Beyond that, I remember that the Bloodlines series by Richelle Mead has 6 books, but Harry Potter has 8. (But wait...not 8 really. Only 7. There are just 8 movies! AH!!! SEE!) The Vampire Academy series hooks you for good with book 3, Shadow Kiss. I remember that I have one book left in Richelle Mead's Age of X series (that I'm not sure if they're even going to end up publishing), but I've only read 1 book of her Dark Swan series. And this is just Richelle Mead. One author.

I remember that Stephenie Meyer spells her name with an E instead of an A. And Kimberly Griffiths Little spells her name with an EY and an S, and Sarah J Maas spells hers with an H and two As. Speaking of Sarah J Maas, Calaena Sardothian is not Caleana even though I say it that way in my head. And Damrik is how I pronounce Darmik the entire time I was reading The Key by Jennifer Anne Davis.

I remember that I have read two different books titled Push. (Authored by Chalene Johnson and Claire Wallis).

I remember that I have 113 books in my possession that I still need to read, but sometimes I feel like I have nothing at all to read.

This is to say nothing of the book covers galore that bombard my memory.

I don't just remember my favorite authors, but I also remember authors that I haven't enjoyed as much so that I don't end up sucked into their books because of the pretty covers. I'm not opposed to having my opinion about an author changed, but if I've read more than one book by an author that I haven't enjoyed I need to remember that.

I have to remember to recommend that new readers read The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices series together and in order of publication date in order to spot small crossovers.

And I have to keep up with the series enders that I've not read yet...or really which books in any series that I haven't read yet.

And seriously you guys...this is only the tip of the iceberg.

Seriously, my brain hurts just trying to think about the massive amount of knowledge that I need to remember.

And boy...don't even ask me what the name of the heroine of the book I JUST finished reading is.

Have you guys ever stopped to think about it? About the memory that being a book blogger requires? Do you guys deal with this problem? Let me know!

Friday, June 2, 2017

Discussions Only We Know: Diversity

Discussions Only We Know

Diversity

The most backlash I've ever gotten from a blog post was when I did a Top Ten Tuesday post which I titled Top Ten Books That Don't Celebrate Diversity. In truth that's not an accurate title for the post, and as my angry commenter pointed out, I probably should have titled the post differently. Yet I stand by the contents of the post itself. The gist of which is that I read a diverse range of characters and genres based on my own personal tastes. I don't read books for the sake of diversity. I read what I want to read when I want to read it. And that's without knowledge of an author's or character's race or culture. It isn't that I'm anti-diversity. Diversity (in race, religion, culture/nationalities) is just not one of the things I consider or seek out when choosing which books to read.

The only other time I've written about diversity here on the blog was when Armchair BEA made it the agenda for the year 2015. In my Introductions post for that year I answered the question "what does diversity mean to me." That post is not unlike the Top Ten Tuesday post where I discuss that I don't choose the books that I read based off the author's gender, age, race, or other cultural background. I often don't even know the nationalities or races of the authors of the books that I read. I read for topics that I enjoy. Simple as that.

See in some ways I can intellectually understand what minorities may be feeling when they never see their race or cultural background discussed in the books that they enjoy reading. In truth, without reading the Christian genre itself I find the Christian characters displayed in the books that I enjoy reading as either flat or stereotypical. In my experience, these characters are usually downright crazy, hypocritical, extremists, or non-existent. This is in total opposition to the majority of Christians that I know personally. Do the extremists, hypocritical, and crazy Christians exists...well of course, but that's not the majority of people that I know. So in some ways, I can see how it could be disheartening to read book after book and yet never see a reflection of your culture or race or whatever it might be that you're looking for.

However, here's something for you to ponder: Although I've read about characters that I relate to, story plots that have been similar to my own experiences, or characters that remind me of someone I know, I have never and I mean never read a book where the character or the story jumped out at me and I thought "this is me and this is my life." Maybe that happens to some people. But considering the total volume of books that I've read over the course of my life, I'd have to say that this isn't the norm. So if that's what you're looking for when you want to read about "diversity"--if you're looking to read a story that is about you--well then you're probably going to have to be the one to write that book.

And that leads me to my next point. In the day and age we live in where anyone, and I do mean anyone, can self-publish a book, what excuse is there if you don't see any books that reflect you or your culture or nationality or your life experiences? I have said over and over in my real life and even here on the blog that you must be the change you wish to see. If there isn't a book published that reflects you, then you must be the one to write it. If traditional publishing companies aren't looking to publish your book because your story is about a minority or they feel like the story won't have mass appeal because it has no connection to their target market, well then find another means of publishing your book. Don't let the word "no" stop you. No one is saying that this process will be easy. Perhaps you're thinking that you're not a writer, or you don't know how to self-publish a book? Well I'm sure every self-published author thought the same thing when they first started out. My point is, there is no excuse. Be the change. Write the book you want to read. Don't just sit there and complain because the book or character or world you want to read doesn't exist. Create it.

In the meantime, leave me in peace to read what I want instead of trying to make me feel bad because I'm not reading about you.

What do you guys think? Do you read the books you read so that you can claim that your reading life is "diverse?" Or do you just read what subjects appeal to you? Do you read for fun or because someone has pressured you into it? Have you ever read a book that you thought reflected not only you but also your life experiences? Or do you see yourself and your experiences lacking in the genres that you enjoy reading? Have you ever considered writing your story? Let me know!

Thursday, June 1, 2017

May 2017 EOM Wrap Up

I have read 4 books this month (not including children's books). *These qualify for the 2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge.
Three Dark Crowns (Three Dark Crowns, # 1) by Kendare Blake
One Dark Throne (Three Dark Crowns, # 2) by Kendare Blake
Shadowcaster (Shattered Realms, # 2) by Cinda Williams Chima
Paris Lights (Heart of the City, # 1) by CJ Duggan

I have reviewed 5 books this month. *These qualify for the 2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge.
Windfall by Jennifer E Smith
Praying the Attributes of God by Ann Spangler
God-Shaped Hole by Tiffanie DeBartolo
Mr. President (Mr. President, # 1) by Katy Evans
The Law of Moses (The Law of Moses, # 1) by Amy Harmon

Other Posts:
Sunday Post - 246 & Stacking the Shelves - 185
Sunday Post - 247 & Stacking the Shelves - 186
Sunday Post - 248
Sunday Post - 249 & Stacking the Shelves - 187
Top Ten Topics on My TBR List
Top Ten Book Moms
Top Ten Summer 2017 TBR List
Top Ten Most Anticipated Releases Q3/Q4 2017
Can't Wait for The Queen and the Cure (The Bird and the Sword Chronicles, # 2) by Amy Harmon
Can't Wait for An Inconvenient Beauty (Hawthorne House, # 4) by Kristi Ann Hunter
Can't Wait for The Loneliest Girl in the World by Lauren James
Can't Wait for All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater
Can't Wait for Renegades by Marissa Meyer
2017 Series Enders Reading Challenge - May Wrap Up
Problems Only We Know # 5: Authors Writing Multiple Series
April 2017 EOM Wrap Up

Goals:
I'm a couple of days behind on my Bible reading plan.
I've read 33 out of 52 books.
I've read 5 out of 10-12 series enders.